Intensive English Institute Achievement Scale Information

Mission

Provide rigorous English instruction and cultural training necessary for success in higher education in the United States. The IEI is committed to the goal of delivering quality evidence-based curriculum, informed by research and designed to prepare non-native speakers of English for the academic language needed for positive outcomes in pursuit of their own higher educational experiences in the U.S.A. The IEI considers its role as a contributor to Middlesex Community College's mission and vision by offering academic excellence and transforming lives through educational and career opportunities for all members of our community. We empower all learners to become productive and socially responsible members of our local and global communities.

MCC’s IEI will report grades based on the college official grading scheme as follows below.  While these grades will not be calculated into the students’ Grade Point Averages and will not earn credit toward graduation, they will provide an achievement scale that is common in educational environments and consistent with what students will experience in academic programs after completion of IEI if they choose to continue to study in colleges and universities in our region. This grade reporting system will take effect will be for students admitted to the fall 2021 semester of the IEI classes.

Grade

Points

Interpretation

A

4.00

93-100

A-

3.65

90-92

B+

3.35

87-89

B

3.00

83-86

B-

2.65

80-82

C+

2.35

77-79

C

2.00

73-76

C-

1.65*

70-72

D+

1.35*

67-69

D

1.00*

63-66

D-

0.65*

60-62

F

0.00

Failure; does not count as course completion

Prerequisite grade for each class must be C-, 70 to 72 %, in order to advance to the next level. Grades below C-, D+, D, D-, and F indicate these classes must be repeated. If a student earns a grade below C-, D+, D, D-, and F, the classes must be repeated the next semester they are available. To earn an overall semester grade of C-, 70 to 72%, or higher and advance to the next level, students are required to pass each of the three classes that comprise their courses (either high intermediate or advanced):

  1. Reading/Writing/Grammar:
    • 4 Grammar Tests score of 70% or higher overall
    • 4 Reading Comprehension Tests score of 70% or higher overall
    • 4 successfully completed writing assignments score of 70% or higher overall
    • Reflective Portfolio Project writing and presentation score of 70% or higher
    • Reading, writing, grammatical knowledge competencies are supported and measured by rubrics that explain the criteria for evaluation.
  2. Listening/Remembering/Note-Taking:
    • 4 assessments including quizzes and/or summaries of audio/video presentations score of 70% or higher overall
    • Listening comprehension demonstrated by successful memory of speaker’s discourse is supported with note-taking techniques. Listening comprehension competences are supported and measured by rubrics that explain the criteria for evaluation.
  3. Conversations and Actions:
    • Speaking skills demonstrated and noted according to instructor checklists (debates, arguments, and expressing opinions) score of 70% or higher
    • Presentation skills demonstrated and noted according to instructor checklists score of 70% or higher
    • Educational cultural skills demonstrated and noted according to instructor checklists score of 70% or higher
    • Conversational abilities and cultural knowledge competencies are supported and measured by rubrics that explain the criteria for evaluation.
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Level Completion and Grading

Intensive English Institute classes and courses are not-for-credit.  Beginning with the fall 2021 semester students will be able to receive grades based on the college’s official grading scheme. While these grades will not be calculated into the students’ grade point averages, and will not earn credit towards graduation, these grades provide an achievement scale that is common in educational environments and consistent with what they will experience in academic programs, after completion of the IEI, if they choose to continue to study in colleges and universities in our region. Prerequisite grade for each class must be C-, 70 to 72 %, in order to advance to the next level.

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Advancement Requirements and Repeating Levels in MCC’s Intensive English Institute

To advance to the next level in the Intensive English Institute the students have met all of the class objectives for their three classes in their course of study. Students who earn grades below C-, D+, D, D-, and F indicate these classes must be repeated. If a student earns a grade below C-, D+, D, D-, and F, the classes must be repeated the next semester they are available. Students may only repeat the course once, (This means the level is taken a total of two times.) If a student fails their course a second time, the student will be referred to another English language program at MCC. This option includes alternative not-for-credit classes which are non-intensive, or in special cases, students may return to the IEI and retake a full placement test to determine a new level placement. Placement beyond the level the student had already failed will permit the student to enroll in the next level.

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MCC’s Intensive English Institute Proficiency Levels

New students will take a placement test before the start of a semester and their classes.  Students who are true beginners are not recommended for placement into the IEI.  Students who place above the IEI’s highest level, advanced IEI-095, are recommended for MCC college programs of study.

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The Online Placement Test

The online placement test evaluates English language communication skills in 4 areas:  reading, writing, listening, and speaking with tasks that evaluate knowledge of grammar. There is no separate vocabulary, as it is tested through all tasks in all sections. The ABLE B2 placement test takes approximately 2 and ½ hours to complete and it is administered online by Hellenic American University. The Director of the Intensive English Institute at Middlesex Community Colleges works collaboratively with the Director of the Office for Language Assessment at Hellenic American University to schedule the placement tests for MCC students. When the placement tests are completed, the IEI Director receives a report with the student’s results and recommended level placement.

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MCC’s IEI’s Placement Test and Appeals Process

Prior to the start of a semester’s courses, new students complete a placement assessment process as follows:

  • To assure potential students have the necessary communication skills to place into either IEI level, high-intermediate or advanced, the IEI Director conducts an initial intake interview to evaluate listening and comprehending spoken language and speaking fluency. Students are asked to respond to a set of questions while the director takes notes and scores their responses against a rubric.
  • The next phase of the initial intake interview involves a reading passage followed by a set of seven questions requiring written answers to evaluate how well the student comprehends written English language.
  • The final phase of the initial intake interview includes a writing prompt based on general understanding of the reading passage and applying that understanding to their own experience.
  • The results of the intake interview are evaluated using rubrics that correspond to IEI levels of instruction.
  • If the potential students either demonstrate proficiency levels below those of the IEI or demonstrate they are prepared for classes more challenging than the advanced level of the IEI, the director introduces them to colleagues who can advise them further. The college has alternative classes to offer to these students.
  • Before the start of a semester’s courses, new students take an online placement test that evaluates English language communication skills in 4 areas: reading, writing, listening, and speaking with tasks that evaluate knowledge of grammar. There is no separate vocabulary, as vocabulary is tested through all tasks in all sections. This test is administered by Hellenic American University and it is called the ABLE B2 test.
  • The IEI Director shares information with IEI instructors regarding each student’s English language communication skills proficiency and production.
  • The 1st and 2nd days of each semester are devoted to orientation to the IEI and MCC. During orientation days instructors conduct sample lessons involving reading, writing, listening, speaking, and grammar to support the students’ placement into the levels.
  • The 3rd and 4th days of each semester are considered trial classes with the students grouped by level based on the placement test results. The instructors continue to assess students during the trial classes on reading, listening, speaking, and writing.
  • The students can be recommended for a change in level, either up or down, as a result. The IEI instructors conference with the students about their placement. The students are asked to provide feedback and if a student needs to be moved up or down, the IEI Director works with the college registrar to facilitate the process.
  • A student can initiate the conversation regarding level placement with the instructors as well during week one of a semester. If a student believes changing the level placement will be beneficial and the instructors support this belief evidenced by the student’s classroom performance and language proficiency skills, the IEI Director will assist the student and instructor with the request to move up or down and with the college registrar to facilitate the process.

There are two levels in MCC’s Intensive English Institute:

  • IEI 090: High Intermediate Intensive English Institute
  • IEI 095: Advanced Intensive English Institute

There are three classes in each semester’s course of MCC’s IEI:

  • Reading/Writing/Grammar
  • Listening/Remembering/Note-Taking
  • Conversations and Actions
  • Also -- twice weekly conference and lab time

There are two 15 to 16-week semesters in each level of MCC’s Intensive English Institute:

  • Fall Semester
  • Winter/Spring Semester
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Achievement Scale

Achievement Scale is based on Student Learning Outcomes for each level. These outcomes describe what students should be able to do in each of the language skill areas after finishing that level, and represent MCC’s Intensive English Institute’s achievement scale. The following descriptions of MCC’s IEI’s courses explain course goals and outcomes and student learning outcomes per class in each course of the two levels. The text materials and curriculum is different in each semester. If a student enters the IEI courses in fall semester, the fall semester’s teaching and learning is different from the winter/spring semester. If a student enters the IEI courses in winter/spring semester, the winter/spring semester’s teaching and learning is different from the fall.

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IEI 090: High-Intermediate Intensive English Institute Courses

Intensive English Institute high-intermediate Reading/Writing/Grammar (B1 & B1+)

Course Description:  In the High-Intermediate Reading/Writing/Grammar (B1) class students learn:

In reading: Students learn how to read academic English language to understand non-fiction texts with some viewpoints.  To achieve success with reading comprehension gains, students learn to use pre-reading techniques to facilitate understanding, apply reading strategies to unlock meaning, and adopt use of active reading skills with textual annotation.  Students learn how to respond to ideas in information they read, recognize differences between fact and opinion, understand abstract concepts found in readings, become familiar with diverse perspectives found in readings, explore inferences, and identify ideas and information to develop viewpoints on topics with support.

In writing: Students learn how to engage in the prewriting, writing, and rewriting process for their assignments in preparation for college course work.  They learn to proofread and edit their papers by writing multiple drafts thanks to peer editing and conferences with instructors.  They learn to produce complex sentences with a wide range of conjunctions, and use transition and/or linking words. They learn to paraphrase, summarize, and write papers with the expectation of producing from ½ of a page to a full page of text with support.

In grammar: Students learn how to actively practice using complex grammatical forms and sentence structure in English to develop necessary proofreading end editing skills through peer review, self-assessment, and just-in-time instruction.  Students learn to review and expand on grammar focusing on most commonly misused grammatical challenges in U.S. higher education courses with support. 

Student Learning Outcomes

Fall Semester (B1) Reading Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Make basic inferences or predictions about text content from headings, titles or headlines.43
  • Identify the main topic and related ideas in a structured text. 49
  • Derive the probable meaning of simple unknown words from short, familiar contexts. 46
  • Recognize the writer’s point of view in a simple academic text, if guided by questions. 48
  • Understand the relationship between a main point and an example in a structured text. 50
  • Understand the main idea of a passage using textual clues. 50

Fall Semester (B1) Writing Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Write a basic paragraph containing a topic sentence and related details, if provided with a model. 45
  • Paraphrase short passages in a simple fashion, using the original text wording and ordering. 48
  • Prepare a simple outline to organize ideas and information. 48
  • Post a comprehensible contribution in online discussion on a familiar topic by preparing text ahead and use online tools to fill gaps in language and check accuracy. 49
  • Write about experiences, feelings and reactions in a simple connected text. 50
  • Write a basic summary of a simple text using the original wording and paragraph order. 50
  • Use a range of common connectors to show chronological sequence. 50

Fall Semester (B1) Grammar Student Learning Outcomes: 

  • Tell when to use past simple and when to use present perfect verb tenses.  44
  • Distinguish between present perfect simple and continuous.  47
  • Use present perfect continuous to refer to ongoing states and conditions.  48
  • Use was/were going to to refer to past intentions. 48
  • Use present simple passive. 48
  • Use while with past simple and past continuous to refer to past actions and states.  50
  • Use going to and will future forms of passive voice. 50

 

Course Description:  In the High-Intermediate Reading/Writing/Grammar (B1+) class students learn:

In reading: Students learn how to read academic English language to understand non-fiction texts with some viewpoints.  To achieve success with reading comprehension gains, students learn to use pre-reading techniques to facilitate understanding, apply reading strategies to unlock meaning, and adopt use of active reading skills with textual annotation.  Students learn how to respond to ideas in information they read, recognize differences between fact and opinion, understand abstract concepts found in readings, become familiar with diverse perspectives found in readings, explore inferences, and identify ideas and information to develop viewpoints on topics, with scaffolding. 

In writing: Students learn how to engage in the prewriting, writing, and rewriting process for their assignments in preparation for college course work.  They learn to proofread and edit their papers by writing multiple drafts thanks to peer editing and conferences with instructors.  They learn to produce complex sentences with a wide range of conjunctions, and use transition and/or linking words. They learn to paraphrase, summarize, and write papers with the expectation of producing up to one full page of text, with scaffolding.  

In grammar: Students learn how to actively practice using complex grammatical forms and sentence structures in English to develop necessary proofreading end editing skills through peer review, self-assessment, and just-in-time instruction.  Students learn to review and expand on grammar focusing on most commonly misused grammatical challenges in U.S. higher education courses, with scaffolding.  

Student Learning Outcomes

Spring Semester (B1+) Reading Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Identify whether an author is quoting or paraphrasing another person. 53
  • Distinguish between fact and opinion in simple academic text. 54
  • Distinguish between different viewpoints in a simple academic text. 55
  • Infer meaning based on information in a text. 55
  • Recognize contrasting ideas in a structured text when signaled by discourse markers. 57
  • Synthesize information from two or more basic texts, if guided by questions. 58

Spring Semester (B1+) Writing Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Write a simple analysis of a structured text. 54
  • Edit and improve a simple text. 55
  • Summarize simple research findings in an academic text, if provided with a model summary. 55
  • Introduce a counter-argument in a simple discursive text using 'however'. 56
  • Write a short, simple academic essay on a familiar topic, if provided with a model. 56
  • Support a main idea with examples and reasons. 57
  • Write a conclusion to a simple academic essay. 58

Spring Semester (B1+) Grammar Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Use a range of common verb + verb combinations using the –ing 51
  • Use I wish/if only to express wishes related to the present or future. 54
  • Describe present or future outcomes of a hypothetical situation using even if and/or unless. 55
  • Use about to to talk about imminent events in the present and past. 55
  • Make statements about plans using plan/intend to + infinitive. 55
  • Make verb tense changes from present to past in reported speech. 56

Intensive English Institute High-intermediate Listening/Remembering/Note-taking (B1 & B1+)

Course Description:   In the High Intermediate Listening, Remembering, Note-Taking course, students learn to improve listening comprehension of spoken English language skills by strengthening the ability to focus on sounds of spoken language, including pronunciation with stress and intonation. They learn to take notes to remember language they hear, and use their notes when demonstrating listening comprehension to express themselves appropriately in an academic setting, with support.  (B1)

Student Learning Outcomes

Fall Semester (B1) Listening/Remembering/Note-Taking Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Follow the main points of extended discussion around them in standard speech.  46
  • Understand main points of narratives/conversations about familiar topics delivered in clear standard speech. 47
  • Comprehend the gist of explanations of unfamiliar and new cultural practices and customs. 48
  • Identify specific information in presentations or lectures when guided by questions. 48
  • Infer opinions in simple presentations or lectures when guided by questions. 49
  • Recognize emphasis through intonation and stress, if guided by questions.  50

Course Description:   In the High Intermediate Listening, Remembering, Note-Taking course, students learn to improve listening comprehension of spoken English language skills by strengthening the ability to focus on sounds of spoken language, including pronunciation with stress and intonation. They learn to take notes to remember language they hear, and use their notes when demonstrating listening comprehension to express themselves appropriately in an academic setting, with scaffolding.  (B1+)

Spring Semester (B1+) Listening/Remembering/Note-Taking Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Identify details supporting point of view in presentations or lectures when guided by questions. 51
  • Distinguish between main ideas and supporting details when guided by questions. 51
  • Distinguish facts from opinions in presentations or lectures when guided by questions. 55
  • Predict content of presentations or lectures by listening to introductory statement, when guided by questions. 55
  • Recognize new topic when introduced in presentations or lectures by discourse markers. 57
  • Deduce the general meaning of a passage from context in a larger, structured text. 57

 

Intensive English Institute High-intermediate Conversations and Actions (B1 & B1+)

Course Description:  In the High Intermediate Conversations and Actions course, students learn to speak the language and become familiar with the culture of the North American higher education classroom.  They learn to facilitate class discussions, ask for clarification, give instructions, discuss and describe problems, and offer solutions.  They learn to speak in front of classmates and participate in group discussions.  They learn how to state and support positions, express agreement or disagreement, solicit opinions, and restate others’ view, with support.  (B1)

Student Learning Outcomes

Fall Semester (B1) Conversations and Actions Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Collaborate in simple, shared tasks and work towards a common goal in a group by asking and answering straightforward questions. 44
  • Convey simple relevant information emphasizing the most important point. 45
  • Explain the meaning of a word or phrase using simple language. 45
  • Express opinions using simple language. 45
  • Express belief, opinion, agreement and disagreement politely. 45
  • Initiate, maintain and close simple, face-to-face conversations on familiar topics. 46

 

Course Description:  In the High Intermediate Conversations and Actions course, students learn to speak the language and become familiar with the culture of the North American higher education classroom.  They learn to facilitate class discussions, ask for clarification, give instructions, discuss and describe problems, and offer solutions.  They learn to speak in front of classmates and participate in group discussions.  They learn how to state and support positions, express agreement or disagreement, solicit opinions, and restate others’ view, with scaffolding.  (B1+)

Spring Semester (B1+) Conversations and Actions Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Ask for clarification during academic discussions using simple language.  54
  • Answer simple factual questions about presentations they have given. 54
  • Effectively participate in classroom discussion about academic topics. 54
  • Express disagreement in a manner showing they were actively listening to the other person. 54
  • Express thoughts in some detail on cultural topics. 55
  • Explain why something is a problem. 55
  • Lead simple discussion, given time in advance to prepare.  55
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IEI 095: Advanced Intensive English Institute Courses

Intensive English Institute Advanced Reading/Writing/Grammar Classes (B2 & B2)

Course Description:  In the Advanced Reading/Writing/Grammar (B2) class the students learn:

In reading: Students learn how to read and understand complex academic texts with multiple viewpoints.  To achieve success with reading comprehension gains, students learn to use pre-reading techniques to facilitate understanding, apply reading strategies to unlock meaning, and adopt use of active reading skills with textual annotation.  Students learn how to critically respond to ideas in information in text, recognize differences between fact and opinion, understand abstract concepts found in readings, become familiar with diverse perspectives found in readings, identify and explain inferences, and synthesize ideas and information to develop viewpoints on topics.

In writing: Students learn how to engage in the prewriting, writing, and rewriting process for their assignments in preparation for college course work.  They learn to proofread and edit papers by writing multiple drafts thanks to peer editing and conferences with instructors.  They learn to produce complex sentences with a wide range of conjunctions, use of transitions, and/or linking words. They learn to paraphrase, summarize, and write papers with the expectation of producing from one full to one and ½ pages of text.

In grammar:  Students learn how to actively practice using complex grammatical forms and sentence structure in English to develop necessary proofreading end editing skills through peer review, self-assessment, just-in-time instruction and conference with instructors.  Students learn to review and expand on grammar focusing on most commonly misused grammatical challenges in U.S. higher education courses.

Student Learning Outcomes:

Fall Semester (B2) Reading Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand simple metaphors in an academic text. 60
  • Understand the author’s purpose and intended audience. 62
  • Recognize the use of reported speech to introduce information from external sources in an academic text. 63
  • Follow the development of a central theme in an academic text.  65
  • Critically evaluate the effectiveness of a simple argumentative essay. 66

Fall Semester (B2) Writing Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Signal additional information in a formal structured text with a range of language. 62
  • Correctly attribute information from different sources. 64
  • Write a concise summary of the main ideas of a longer structured text.64
  • Make accessible for others the main contents of a text on a subject of interest (e.g. an essay, a forum discussion, a presentation) by paraphrasing in simpler language. 65
  • Structure longer texts in clear, logical paragraphs. 65
  • Correct errors in a piece of academic writing if helped to identify them first. 66
  • Show the relationship between an opinion and a counter-argument in a discursive text. 66

Fall Semester (B2) Grammar Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Use range of modals with passive voice infinitive form. 59
  • Use future continuous with reference to actions in progress at specific time in future. 60
  • Use past perfect continuous tense in range of common situations. 62
  • Use the past perfect tense verbs with adverbial clauses of time. 63
  • Use past perfect tense in passive voice. 64
  • Use future perfect tense with reference to actions to be completed by a specific time in the future. 66

Course Description:  In the Advanced Reading/Writing/Grammar class the students learn:

In reading: Students learn how to read and understand complex academic texts with multiple viewpoints.  To achieve success with reading comprehension gains, students learn to use pre-reading techniques to facilitate understanding, apply reading strategies to unlock meaning, and adopt use of active reading skills with textual annotation.  Students learn how to critically respond to ideas in information in text, recognize differences between fact and opinion, understand abstract concepts found in readings, become familiar with diverse perspectives found in readings, identify and explain inferences, and synthesize ideas and information to develop viewpoints on topics.

In writing: Students learn how to engage in the prewriting, writing, and rewriting process for their assignments in preparation for college course work. They learn to proofread and edit papers by writing multiple drafts thanks to peer editing and conferences with instructors. They learn to produce complex sentences with a wide range of conjunctions, use of transitions, and/or linking words. They learn to paraphrase, summarize, and write papers with the expectation of producing from one and ½ to two pages of text.

In grammar:  Students learn how to actively practice using complex grammatical forms and sentence structure in English to develop necessary proofreading end editing skills through peer review, self-assessment, just-in-time instruction and conference with instructors.  Students learn to review and expand on grammar focusing on most commonly misused grammatical challenges in U.S. higher education courses.

Homework is assigned daily.  Lab/conference time accompanies class and provides support and practice in reading, writing, or grammatical challenges.

Prerequisite:  Completion of high-intermediate integrated skills course with a grade of C- or higher or placement by assessment and instructor feedback.

Spring Semester (B2+) Reading Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Recognize the repetition of ideas expressed by substitution, paraphrasing, etc. 67
  • Understand differences and similarities between points of view in extended texts. 67
  • Recognize contrasting arguments in structured, discursive text. 68
  • Understand the positive and negative connotations of words that have similar meanings. 68
  • Infer what will come next in an unstructured text by using contextual, grammatical and lexical cues. 68
  • Use relevant material in academic textbooks and articles to support or challenge an argument. 72

Spring Semester (B2+) Writing Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Clarify a concept in a narrative text using adverbial clauses, phrases and modifiers. 70
  • Use parallel structure in academic writing. 70
  • Introduce and reference sources in written academic work. 71
  • Signal the difference between fact and opinion in a linguistically complex academic text. 71
  • Support a line of argument in an academic text using indirect quotes. 71
  • Write a detailed, reasoned argument for or against a case. 72
  • Develop an argument with appropriate highlighting of significant points and relevant supporting detail. 73

Spring Semester (B2+) Grammar Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Describe hypothetical current results of a past action or situation using would. . .  with the third conditional. 67
  • Use it is/was believed/reported that + verb phrase to report beliefs, reports, rumors, etc. 67
  • Use as if/as though with the past simple to refer to hypothetical or counterfactual circumstances. 71
  • Use range of cleft sentences in present, past, and future.  71
  • Use since to talk about reasons, causes, and explanations. 72
  • Invert subject and verb after initial complex adverbials.  74
  • Add information using appended clauses with being and/or passive participles. 76

 

Intensive English Institute Advanced Listening/Remembering/Note-Taking (B2 & B2+)

Course Description:  Intensive English Institute Advanced Listening/Remembering/Note-Taking (B2) Students learn to strengthen listening comprehension of spoken English language skills by focusing on the sounds of spoken language, including pronunciation with stress and intonation. They learn to take and use notes to remember language they hear, and demonstrate listening comprehension to express themselves appropriately in an academic setting.

Student Learning Outcomes

Fall Semester (B2) Listening/Remembering/Note-Taking Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Recognize paraphrasing and repetition in presentations or lectures when guided by questions.   61
  • Critically evaluate the effectiveness of visual materials in presentations with support 62
  • Understand main points & details while checking comprehension by using contextual clues. 64
  • Follow chronological sequences in extended speech at natural speed.   65
  • Extract main point of view by listening to news items, opinions, arguments, & discussions. 65
  • Recognize tone and intended audience of formal presentations or lectures.  66
  • Distinguish between fact and opinion in informal discussion at natural speed.  66

Course Description: Intensive English Institute Advanced Listening/Remembering/Note-Taking (B2+) Students learn to strengthen listening comprehension of spoken English language skills by focusing on the sounds of spoken language, including pronunciation with stress and intonation. They learn to take and use notes to remember language they hear, and demonstrate listening comprehension to express themselves appropriately in an academic setting.

Spring Semester (B2+) Listening/Remembering/Note-Taking Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Extract key details from extended informational lectures delivered in clear standard speech.  67
  • Follow discussions involving use of some idiomatic language.  68
  • Infer attitude and mood in conversations using contextual, grammatical, and lexical cues.  71
  • Recognize use of language expressing doubt in presentations or lectures.  71
  • Identify speaker’s personal bias in presentations or lectures.  73
  • Evaluate strength of speaker’s argument in presentations or lectures.  74
  • Follow lines of argument in complex presentations, lectures, or discussions. 75

 

Intensive English Institute Advanced Conversations and Actions Class

Course Description:  In Advanced Conversations and Actions (B2) class students learn to speak the language and know the culture of the North American higher education classroom.  They learn to facilitate class discussions, ask for clarification, give instructions, discuss and describe problems, and offer solutions.  They learn to speak in front of native-speaking classmates and participate in group discussions.  They learn how to state and support positions, express agreement or disagreement, solicit opinions, and restate others’ view.

Student Learning Outcomes:

Fall Semester (B2) Conversations and Actions Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Tell short stories about something humorous or interesting including details to maintain listeners’ interest. 59
  • Justify viewpoint on a familiar issue by discussing the pros and cons of various options. 60
  • Make an effective introduction and opening to a presentation. 60
  • Make an effective summary and conclusion to a presentation. 65
  • Elaborate on points made in discussions. 61
  • Explain two different sides of an issue, giving arguments for and against, and propose a solution for compromise. 61
  • Clearly justify and sustain a viewpoint by providing relevant explanations and arguments.  60


In Advanced Conversations and Actions (B2+) class students learn to speak the language and know the culture of the North American higher education classroom.  They learn to facilitate class discussions, ask for clarification, give instructions, discuss and describe problems, and offer solutions.  They learn to speak in front of native-speaking classmates and participate in group discussions.  They learn how to state and support positions, express agreement or disagreement, solicit opinions, and restate others’ view.

Spring Semester (B2+) Conversations and Actions Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Initiate, maintain, and end discourse naturally with effective turn-taking. 68
  • Present factual information objectively in extended spoken discourse. 69
  • Present ideas with precision and respond to complex lines of argument convincingly. 70
  • Give well-structured, detailed presentations on wide range of familiar topics. 71
  • Demonstrate appreciation of perspectives other than that of their own worldview, & express themselves in a way appropriate to context in intercultural encounters. 71
  • Effectively and appropriately challenge ideas in academic discussion. 75
  • Describe conclusions drawn from complex presentations or lectures. 75
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Letter of Recognition

At your request, MCC’s IEI will generate a letter of recognition upon conclusion of classes. A letter of recognition confirms your success in accomplishing your learning goals in the Intensive English Institute classes and will list course level, classroom hours attended, semester, term, and year of completion.

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Attend 15 to 16-week course

All IEI students come to class 4 times a week for 15 to 16 weeks. Each class meets for 2 and ½ hours each morning and 2 hours each afternoon. Students are expected to attend every class.

Students are required to be at least 80% present in their classes to be considered progressing in their program. This is especially important when learning a second language. Attendance is carefully taken for each class throughout each week and each semester. It is widely recognized in education that attending classes is the most important factor impacting student success and progress.

Student academic success is of utmost importance to MCC’s IEI instructors and director. As a result, If students are getting close to falling below the 80% attendancerequirement, the following steps will be taken:

  • IEI instructors will talk with students about their attendance and absenteeism patterns and remind them of the 80% attendance requirement and the importance of academic and language learning success.
  • IEI instructors will notify IEI director with an e-mail message regarding any student who is at risk of falling below the 80% requirement for attendance and that they have had a conversation with the students involved.
  • IEI director will reach out to the students who are at risk of falling below the 80% requirement for attendance via e-mail and telephone to confirm their comprehension and to discuss a plan for improvement.
  • IEI director will update and inform the IEI instructors via e-mail summarizing the conversations with the students who are at risk of falling below the 80% requirement for attendance.
  • If the students fall below the 80% requirement for attendance despite the steps for intervention, they will be advised to withdraw from the class.
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Last Modified: 8/17/22